Initial ideas for class re-creation

Class ideas

  • Recreate History class (4)
  • Recreate Education class
  • Recreate Home Economics
  • recreate photos from decade site — Sarah L.
  • Recreate Theater class (in the amphitheater) — Stephanie
  • Senior Day? — Brooke
  • One fun class and one serious class

 

Roles

  • Include veterans (a few) who were still around in early 1950s.
  • “Maybe each person could pick a major, not necessarily the same one they’re pursuing now, and look through courses and make a list of classes they’ve already taken, then think of a reason why they’re taking the particular class we reenact. If that works, maybe the same can be done for extracurricular activities (clubs, sports, etc.) so that we each have a small built-in scenario we can play with and use to interact with each other; this could bring in the non-academic resources as naturally as possible.” — Carrie
  • Students as students, McClurken as Professor


Working in non-academic items

  • – “There can be discussions in class about things that are happening and perhaps announcements made at the beginning of class of things that are happening socially around campus.”–Carolyn
  • – “I think the best way to do this would be to do what Dr. McClurken does at the beginning of our classes today: ask the class what they did over the weekend/ what their plans are for the week. Maybe there could be a dance or other social event coming up, or a new rule or privilege could have just been introduced.  A short discussion at the beginning of class of the world outside academics would be a great way to give a little authenticity to the class and also work in the elements that are not purely academic.” — Grace


Material/props/dress

  • Library — “ a handout, maybe – that would capture what using the library was like for students in the 50s.  A guide to the Dewey Decimal System, how to use a card catalog. “
  • Dress — General agreement that we should try to dress in 1950s style.  Ask Prof. McCluskey for help?
  • Material Culture — books?  Technology?  Notepads
  • Lots of suggestions here: http://umwtimewarp.umwblogs.org/2012/03/26/how-to-recreate-the-1950s-class/

 

Sources:

  • 1950s site, interviews, Dr. Crawley’s book, Battlefield, photos, Prof. McCluskey

Reminder

Remember that Tuesday we’ll be discussing “Text Mining, N-Grams and Searching in History”.  Come ready to talk about these ideas.

Reading/Viewing: Peter Norvig talk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU8DcBF-qo4 – Skim); Carr, Is Google Making Us Stupid? (2008); Dan Cohen, “From Babel to Knowledge” (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march06/cohen/03cohen.html); William Turkel, “Searching for History,” Digital History Hacks (12 Oct 2006). “Applying Quantitative Analysis to Classic Lit,” Wired, Dec. 2009; Cohen, Google Books, Ngrams and Culturomics; Rob Nelson, Mining the Dispatch.

The Decade Has Been Chosen

We will be recreating the 1950s

– What class/discipline should we re-create?

– What roles should people have?

– What sources will we use?

– How will we work in non-academic material?

– Material aspects (clothes? books?)

Blog your suggestions this weekend.

Posted in: Uncategorized |

Visiting Parson Weems’s House

A bit of a break from my normal discussions about teaching and technology:

Today, my family and I had the chance to visit a house once owned by Parson (Mason Locke) Weems, famed for writing the first biography of George Washington (and the man responsible for introducing that silly story about Washington chopping down the cherry tree as a child).  The house is for sale at auction next month and today was an open house.  My family doesn't have much chance of buying it (though I was assured that it could well sell for "under a million"), but we enjoyed touring the house and the 25 acre grounds of Bel Air (especially since after the sale, it's likely to be inaccessible again as a private residence).

Originally built in the 1740s, it was renovated in the late 19th Century and again in the mid- and late 20th Century.  It is oddly accessed by driving through a very modern neighborhood (a contrast which I tried to capture in the last group of pictures in the Flickr slideshow at the bottom of the page).  There is a great deal of land that comes with the house, but the house itself is quite close to the neighborhood and a nearby modern church building.  Still, the house is a wonderful blend of the modern and the colonial, from the formal sitting rooms on the main floor (see image below) to the wireless router and laser printer in the office, from the servant staircase that leads to a door on the second floor living room and the full hearth in the same room as the modernized kitchen appliances.  The grounds would be a wonderful place for a garden party, although they could use a little work.  There is also a small family graveyard, where Weems is apparently (though not definitively) buried.

All in all, it was a pleasant way to spend an afternoon with my family.  Now we just have to start a Kickstarter fundraiser to be able to buy the house ourselves.


Formal Sitting Room on Main Floor (captured using Photosynth)



Posted in: Uncategorized |

Visiting Parson Weems’s House

A bit of a break from my normal discussions about teaching and technology:

Today, my family and I had the chance to visit a house once owned by Parson (Mason Locke) Weems, famed for writing the first biography of George Washington (and the man responsible for introducing that silly story about Washington chopping down the cherry tree as a child).  The house is for sale at auction next month and today was an open house.  My family doesn't have much chance of buying it (though I was assured that it could well sell for "under a million"), but we enjoyed touring the house and the 25 acre grounds of Bel Air (especially since after the sale, it's likely to be inaccessible again as a private residence).

Originally built in the 1740s, it was renovated in the late 19th Century and again in the mid- and late 20th Century.  It is oddly accessed by driving through a very modern neighborhood (a contrast which I tried to capture in the last group of pictures in the Flickr slideshow at the bottom of the page).  There is a great deal of land that comes with the house, but the house itself is quite close to the neighborhood and a nearby modern church building.  Still, the house is a wonderful blend of the modern and the colonial, from the formal sitting rooms on the main floor (see image below) to the wireless router and laser printer in the office, from the servant staircase that leads to a door on the second floor living room and the full hearth in the same room as the modernized kitchen appliances.  The grounds would be a wonderful place for a garden party, although they could use a little work.  There is also a small family graveyard, where Weems is apparently (though not definitively) buried.

All in all, it was a pleasant way to spend an afternoon with my family.  Now we just have to start a Kickstarter fundraiser to be able to buy the house ourselves.


Formal Sitting Room on Main Floor (captured using Photosynth)



Posted in: Uncategorized |

Vote now on the UMW decade sites

The research sites on the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s that my US Women's History students have created as part of our project to re-create the Mary Washington college classroom experience are now up on the course site.

Please check the sites out, and vote for the site that you think provides the best set of resources for our class to actually re-create the classroom experience.

Thanks!


Vote now on the UMW decade sites

The research sites on the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s that my US Women's History students have created as part of our project to re-create the Mary Washington college classroom experience are now up on the course site.

Please check the sites out, and vote for the site that you think provides the best set of resources for our class to actually re-create the classroom experience.

Thanks!